Episode 1: U-190 and ENIGMA

On May 8th, 1945, the European front of Second World War ended with Germany’s unconditional surrender. 500 miles off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, German submarine U-190 surfaces and surrenders to Canadian warships the HMCS Victoriaville and the HMCS Thorlock.

The Royal Canadian Navy escorted U-190 to harbour where the German crew signed formal surrender papers and the U-boat became the property of the RCN. On board the submarine RCN personnel recovered a German Enigma machine. The Enigma machine recovered on U-190 is now part of CSE’s collection of historical artifacts.

Episode 1: U-190 and ENIGMA - Transcript

(Music: Maple Leaf Forever)

(CSE Crest in background with text: Communications Security Establishment Film Unit Presents Communcations Security Establishment News Reel Issue No. 1)

May 8th, 1945. It’s over, over there!

(Canadians celebrating VE day on city streets.)

(World War II video of Canadian navy sailors aboard ships in the ocean.)

The war in Europe is over and Germany has ordered all active U-Boats to surrender to Allied forces.

(Video and photographs of German submarine U-190 in the ocean.)

500 miles off the coast of Newfoundland, U-190 surfaces and surrenders to Canadian warships the HMCS Victoriaville and the HMCS Thorlock.

(Image of official surrender paper signed by the captain of U-190 in 1945.)

(Photos of Royal Canadian Navy brining U-190 into harbour in Newfoundland.)

Commandeered by our brave members of the Royal Canadian Navy, U-190 is brought into harbour.

(Photo of interior of U-190.)

On board the German submarine, navy personnel find and seize one of the most famous enciphering machines ever made – an Enigma.

(World War II era photos of German soldiers using Enigma machines.)

The Enigma, in wide use by German armed forces and intelligence throughout the war, allowed operators to type and encrypt messages. Using up to five rotor wheels, these machines produced a complex polyalphabetic cypher.

(Photos of Enigma machine and CSE museum.)

The Enigma machine captured onboard U-190 is now part of CSE’s collection of historical artefacts on display at Edward Drake Building.

It is a link to our roots in wartime cryptography and our mission to provide and protect information, through leading edge technology, and through synergy with our partners.

(Photos of CSE buildings.)

For over 70 years CSE has been Canada’s national cryptologic agency, safeguarding Canada’s security through information superiority.

(CSE Crest in background with text: Produced By CSE Film Unit Recorded At Edward Drake Building Ottawa)

(Canada Word Mark with waving flag.)